10 Facts About Parkinson’s Disease

//10 Facts About Parkinson’s Disease

10 Facts About Parkinson’s Disease

1) The cause is unknown and there is no cure.  What causes Parkinson’s remains largely unknown.  Although there is no cure, treatment options vary and can include medications and surgery.

2) People with Parkinson’s can have a good quality of life. There is no one-size-fits-all treatment approach when it comes to Parkinson’s. Medication, surgical therapy and lifestyle modifications help manage the disease.

3) No two people have the same exact symptoms. The progression of symptoms is often different from one person to another due to the diversity of the disease.

4) Non-movement symptoms can be more troublesome than motor symptoms. They can include cognitive changes, mood disorders, fatigues, hallucinations and delusions, sexual problems and sleep disorders.

5) Small handwriting and loss of smell are early signs of Parkinson’s. Not being able to smell bananas, dill pickles and licorice is a common warning sign.

6) Exercise helps manage Parkinson’s symptoms. Exercise is vital to maintaining balance, mobility and activities of daily living.

7) Parkinson’s should be treated through a team approach.  A team of healthcare professionals, including a movement disorders specialist, physical therapist, occupational therapist, speech therapist and nutritionist can help tackle day-to-day challenges more effectively.

8) People with Parkinson’s are not always angry or sad. Often, people with Parkinson’s look serious, depressed or mad, but many times the disease is causing facial masking, where muscles in the face are stiff or take a long time to move.

9) We must improve treatment. The Parkinson’s Foundation drives the development of new treatments through its Center of Excellence network – leading medical centers that deliver care to more than 100,000 people with Parkinson’s.

10) The Parkinson’s community is strong. The Parkinson’s Foundation is here to serve and support the global Parkinson’s community, including family members and caregivers.

Source: Parkinson’s Foundation, parkinson.org

By |2018-08-17T13:32:02+00:00August 17th, 2018|News|